Post-Scout Depression

depression-brain-scanPost-Scout Depression (scientifically called Sanic withdrawal) is a common medical condition linked with the sudden loss of sanics. Typically, the onset of ‘PSD‘ is caused by switching from a class or loadout with a high sanic rating to one with a significantly lower sanic rating. The result of the abrupt change is a noticeable depression in brain activity as the patient adjusts to their new limitations, a step which is clinically referred to as ‘sanic withdrawal’.

Symptoms of PSD include: lowered neural activity (see PET scan), dopamine deficiency, anger or irritability, slurred speech, loss of energy, inability to avoid damage, and reckless behaviour. Many of these symptoms are linked with PSD’s twin metabolic disorder, sanic dependence, which is caused by a patient’s body becoming too reliant on their sanics to avoid damage or to disengage effectively after overextending, allowing them to coast by on relatively sloppy play.

There are no remedies for post-scout depression. Despite this, Imperial doctors and medical researchers recommend, when switching from a high sanic class or loadout to a lower one, to transition slowly and in multi-class intervals. These preventative measures have shown great success in reducing the effect of sanic dependence, and in effect, PSD.

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